NLP Techniques: A Preliminary Cornerstone List (2019 Update)

On this page, you will find 113 NLP techniques that I've been compiling over the years — in alphabetical orders.

Eventually, all of these NLP techniques will be linked to descriptive pages on this site and the rest of the internet.

However, before we get into them, in the spirit of being thorough, let me begin with a...

Disclaimer

"NLP techniques" is kind of a weird term.

First, for purists, NLP offers no technique. It offers a modeling methodology and code. Whatever patterns a practitioner distills from his or her modeling activities pertain to their native field — not to the field of NLP.

Second, most of these so-called NLP techniques are really protocols of change — sets of step-by-step instructions that an individual can follow to assist another in creating change in his or her life.

As such, it's useful to distinguish the term "technique" from the term "protocol."

Third, some of these "NLP techniques" are really skills. Anchoring, calibration and analogue marking, just to mention a few examples, are competencies that a practitioner has to practice. They are not a technique that someone can simply follow and apply.

So, with these caveats out of the way...

  1. Aligning Perceptual Positions
  2. Analogue Marking
  3. Anchoring
  4. Belief Chaining
  5. Calibration
  6. Cause and Effect Distortions
  7. Chaining States
  8. Changing Personal History
  9. Chunking Down
  10. Chunking Up
  11. Circle Of Excellence
  12. Collapsing Anchors
  13. Comparative Deletions
  14. Complex Equivalence
  15. Compulsion Blow-Out
  16. Conflict Resolution
  17. Conflicting Beliefs Integration
  18. Congruence
  19. Conscious And Subconscious
  20. Conversational Hypnosis
  21. Conversational Postulate
  22. Core Transformation
  23. Criteria Installation
  24. Decision Destroyer
  25. Deletions
  26. Denominalization
  27. Disjunction
  28. Distortions
  29. Double Binds
  30. Downtime
  31. Ecology Check
  32. Elicitation Of Learning Strategies
  33. Eliciting Subconscious Responses
  34. Embedded Commands
  35. Emotional Pain Management
  36. Extended Quotes
  37. Generalizations
  38. Hierarchy Of Criteria
  39. Hypnosis
  40. Implied Causes
  41. Inducing Amnesia
  42. Interrupting Limiting Associations
  43. Intonation
  44. Kinesthetic Criteria
  45. Lack of Referential Index
  46. Linguistic Ambiguities
  47. Linking Words
  48. Logical Levels
  49. Lost Performatives
  50. Meta Model
  51. Meta Programs
  52. Meta Transformation
  53. Meta-Model Challenging
  54. Meta-Model Intentional Usage
  55. Meta-Model Violations
  56. Metaphors
  57. Meta-Programs Identification
  58. Meta-states
  59. Milton Model
  60. Milton Model
  61. Mind Reading
  62. Mirroring
  63. Modal Operators
  64. Modeling: Second Position
  65. Modeling: States Of Excellence
  66. Modeling: Third Position
  67. Nested Loops
  68. Nesting
  69. New Behavior Generator
  70. Nominalization
  71. Non-Verbal Cues Recognition
  72. Parts Conflict Integration
  73. Parts Negotiation
  74. Pattern Interrupt
  75. Perceptual Positions
  76. Phobia Cure
  77. Phonological Ambiguities
  78. Presuppositions
  79. Punctuation Ambiguities
  80. Quotes pattern
  81. Rapport: How To Create And Sustain Rapport
  82. Rapport: Pacing & Matching
  83. Rapport: Pacing and Leading
  84. Re-Imprinting
  85. Resolving Internal Conflicts
  86. Resourceful States
  87. Scope Ambiguities
  88. Selectional Restriction Violations
  89. Self Anchoring
  90. Sensory Acuity
  91. Six Steps Reframing
  92. Sleight Of Mouth: Content Reframing
  93. Sleight Of Mouth: Context Reframing
  94. Sleight Of Mouth: Outframing
  95. Sliding anchors
  96. State Induction
  97. State Of Consciousness Awareness
  98. Stimulating Representational Systems: Auditory
  99. Stimulating Representational Systems: Kinesthetic
  100. Stimulating Representational Systems: Visual
  101. Subliminal Persuasion
  102. Submodalities: Digital Vs. Analogue
  103. Submodality Overlapping
  104. Swish Pattern
  105. Syntactic Ambiguities
  106. Tag Questions
  107. Transderivational Search
  108. Universal Quantifiers
  109. Using Rep Systems
  110. Utilization
  111. Values Hierarchy Identification
  112. Visual Squash
  113. Well Defined Outcomes

A Conversation With Marijn Tulp

Marijn Tulp works as a Quality Manager in the Netherlands. He recently participated in an introductory NLP program and, to continue learning more, subscribed to dailyNLP.

A few weeks ago, he reached out to me to share his brand new NLP blog. As I went through his first entries, I instantly noticed that he's cut from the same cloth I am when it comes to learning and practicing NLP.

You can visit his blog, NLP In Practice, at https://nlpinpractice.home.blog/blog/

I invited him for a conversation about NLP, his first steps in the field and his roadmap to deepen his learning. We also touched on how your personal metaphors and models impact common activities, such as goal-setting. You will find Marijn's goal drawing under the video.

Marijn says:

I hope people learn from my experiences and will be motivated to apply NLP techniques as well. The more people share with each other, the more we learn from one another.

It's practical and refreshing! I hope you enjoy Marijn's insights as much as I did.

Here is Marijn's drawing of his goal-setting...

11

4 Tony Robbins NLP Secrets You Shouldn’t Overlook

The Tony Robbins NLP style has introduced more people to Neurolinguistic Programming than any other NLP teacher I can think of.

While many practitioners frequently dismiss him as being no more than a showman, a businessman or a “disco” NLPer, we can still learn much from him. I for one have participated in almost all of his trainings, for reasons I’ll explain in greater details in this article.

Do you know how Tony Robbins
covertly influences his audience?

Oh, don't take it from me... Hear it straight from the horse's mouth. In this 10-minute video, you will hear TONY use the pattern at the beginning of his UPW seminar. I then break it down for you so you can use the exact same structure in your own communication. I also give you a step-by-step framework to build the pattern for yourself.

1. Model.

Anthony Robbins achieved what he achieved because he understood and practices constantly the core discipline of Neurolinguistic Programming: modeling.

In an interview, John Grinder retells of the days when Anthony Robbins was his student. He recounts that once the seminar ended, Tony approached him and said he understood that modeling lied at the heart of the field and that he was committed to modeling. He then asked Grinder what project he could undertake to prove his commitment. John Grinder suggested firewalking. “The rest,” as Grinder puts it, “is history.”

Anthony Robbins is primarily a modeler and you must adopt this identity.

2. Do what works.

In his seminars, Anthony Robbins amply demonstrates his change techniques.

The advanced student can pinpoint NLP therapeutic patterns in his interventions, but also other patterns that he created or incorporated from other fields into his work. The most important trait he demonstrates during his intervention is his absolute commitment to getting the result that he’s after, notably to move another human being into a place of greater access to inner resources.

He’s a master at doing this.

3. Involve physiology at all times.

In his seminars, Anthony Robbins amply demonstrates his change techniques.

The advanced student can pinpoint NLP therapeutic patterns in his interventions, but also other patterns that he created or incorporated from other fields into his work. The most important trait he demonstrates during his intervention is his absolute commitment to getting the result that he’s after, notably to move another human being into a place of greater access to inner resources.

He’s a master at doing this.

3. Involve physiology at all times.

Few if any other trainers focus on physiology as fiercely and intensely as Anthony Robbins does.

The only one I’ve come across who focuses as intently on physiology was his teacher: John Grinder. To him, physiology defines the limits of a person’s access to his or her resources. That’s why he pushes and stretches all participants in his seminars to get to their physical edge.

Tony Robbins understands that, on account of the mind-body connectionyou can only go as far as your physiology permits.

4. Learn from and pay attention to John Grinder.

This lesson is perhaps the strangest or most uncommon of all. But you must attend to it. Of all the early students of Neurolinguistic Programming, Anthony Robbins is far and away the most successful. This is not to say that he is the best teacher or that he has reached a greater refinement in exercising his skills. But he has leveraged his mastery to accomplish more than any other student in the world. And his master was John Grinder.

Richard Bandler enjoys the greater popularity of the two co-founders. The term “Richard Bandler” receives more than 10,000 searches a month, while “John Grinder” receives less than 2,000. His creativity and mastery of language keeps seminar participants spellbound during days. I acknowledge Bandler as the creative force behind NLP. Yet, Bandler lacks the health, discipline and vitality that I’d expect from someone who has mastered NLP.

That’s where John Grinder shows up. Well in his sixties, he actively involves himself in challenging physical activities such as climbing and scuba diving, constantly pushing his edge. And while I’ve never heard or seen him display the verbal prowesses that Bandler displays, he is a much more inspiring model overall to aspire to. I recognize him to be the organizing, disciplined and directive force behind NLP. And this distinction is absolutely fundamental. Anthony Robbins has benefitted from this.

What Anthony Robbins Can Teach You

If you’re new to NLP, don’t be too quick to judge Anthony Robbins. Many people in the field trash him day in day out. The most important thing to keep in mind is to learn from Anthony Robbins by watching him, as opposed to listening to what he teaches. Observe how he works. Observe his movements. Observe his posture. Feel his intensity. Hear his tonality. In other words, model him. Just as Grinder and Bandler paid little attention to what Milton Erickson had to say about hypnosis and a lot of attention to what he did to produce results.

Anthony Robbins is a genius at producing change within people (and also marketing himself and his products) and for that reason, you’ll find it worth your time to model him.

The neat thing about his work is that it has a specific structure — and you can learn to emulate it.

Do you know how Tony Robbins
covertly influences his audience?

Oh, don't take it from me... Hear it straight from the horse's mouth. In this 10-minute video, you will hear TONY use the pattern at the beginning of his UPW seminar. I then break it down for you so you can use the exact same structure in your own communication. I also give you a step-by-step framework to build the pattern for yourself.

The 10 Best NLP Books To Learn More About It (2019 Update)

The following list offers the top 10 NLP books I recommend you read. Once you're done, you will have a VERY solid grasp on the field.

This list contains beginner level material that can serve as an introduction to Neuro-Linguistic Programming. It also contains more advanced material that offers important distinctions to make a serious difference in your business career. 

Continue reading

How To Become Great At Sales By Developing A Top Salesperson Mindset

What determines whether or not you can sell?

What will make you successful at business so you can achieve the income level you desire?

The strategies we use definitely have an impact. However, the #1 driver that determines whether or not someone will learn how to sell is their BELIEFS about selling.

Our beliefs, which are the feelings, thoughts and ideas that we associate to sales, typically determine whether or not we will be able to become effective at selling.

Our "Sales Blueprint" guides us and pulls us towards our actions.

This Sales Blueprint (our beliefs about selling) controls every decision we make and every one of our actions in our business. Many of us have "inner conflicts" or "disempowering beliefs" that limit our ability to communicate what we have to offer.

Continue reading

Do as I do, not as I say

Every expert in the world, especially teachers and public speakers, should have that tattooed on their forehead when they step up to give a speech.

Therapists tried to figure out what Milton Erickson was doing for years before Bandler and Grinder came along.

Milton lectured! Milton taught!

People heard it from the horse’s mouth. But for some reason, they didn’t get it.

That’s the way it goes for most areas.

If you listen to someone talk ABOUT it, you’ll seldom get it.

Continue reading

The Joker’s Self Confidence Formula

The Dark Knight was on TV yesterday in my neck of the woods.

Wow, I can’t believe it’s already been five years…

Time flies.

Needless to say, the Joker is the main character of that movie. That’s probably the way it ought to be for any superhero action movie.

—– SIDEBAR —–

Some people criticized the Batman movies for that. They said that Batman was a supporting role for the villains.

Well, of course.

Stop and think for a second. What do superheroes do?

Continue reading

The Most Uncanny Way To Keep A Suicidal Person Alive

How do you keep a suicidal person alive without them even knowing what you’re doing? I’ll tell you in a second.

Dan Brown recently released his latest novel, titled Inferno. It’s been out for a little while. Maybe you’ve read it already. I need a good weekend when I can sit down, tune out the world and just immerse myself in that world.

From what my friends tell me, Dan Brown continues to deliver his highly addictive, cocaine-soaked writing style in this one. History, art, codes, symbols, futuristic science, secret passages, riddles… It’s all there.

Of course, it’s a NY Times bestseller. “Ça va de soi.”

One of the questions I’ve been asking myself is: how these guys pull it off?

Continue reading

Chris got it. Do you get it?

When I started dailyNLP 6 years ago, I envisioned the day I would receive this email.

dailyNLP came later, but the mission was the exact same.

Well, this day has arrived. And I must celebrate it with you.

Chris has authorized me to share his message with you.

Enter Chris:

Hi Martin,

I want to thank you again for your various NLP sites.

Although I think I’ve read everything at “dailyNLP.com” before, something clicked today when I re-visited.

It now seems obvious to me that a lot of the confusion about NLP results from associating “work product” from an NLP mapping project with NLP itself.

I posted an analogy on one of your blog entries about how I might use NLP to map out the process necessary to make the same amazing hamburger that a famous chef is known to make. In the end, I have a repeatable process for making that amazing burger. The burger is not NLP. Making the burger is not NLP. NLP was used to map that process. The making of the burger is simply a codified process.

If this is true, then it follows that “The Swish Pattern” and similar techniques also are not NLP, but instead therapy techniques that were famously mapped by NLP. They show up alongside NLP perhaps as a demonstration, creating (for me, at least) a bit of confusion in terms of what NLP is. You explain it very clearly in your “What is NLP” page, but I couldn’t accept it at the time.

This makes things a lot clearer for me unless I’m completely mistaken about this.

On the other hand, it presents a crossroads for me- do I follow the path of learning to map using NLP or do I follow the path of using techniques that were mapped by NLP. Perhaps its not a choice that has to be made.

Thank you for your effort in making NLP accessible to anyone.

-Chris

Back to Martin:

Well done, Chris! Congratulations!

In his message, Chris refers to a comment he posted on the [masterNLP] website.

You can read his comment here:

https://dailynlp.com/faq-can-i-solve-a-bunch-of-personal-problems-using-nlp-on-myself/comment-page-1/#comment-1439

It complements nicely the observation he makes in the message.

Bottom line: Chris now gets it.

The real question is: do you?

Because once you understand this distinction, you get wings. Confusion ends. The fog of NLP lifts. And you’re able to do anything you please from that point forward.

You’ve made the distinction between NLP and changework/therapy/coaching.

I desperately hope that you either have reached or will reach the same understanding Chris has.

His journey has only just begun.

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