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How Not To Use The Meta Model

[audio:http://dailynlp.com/audio/DailyNLP20130607.mp3]

Coaching threads are going wild on Voxer. It’s unbelievable the impact you can have in less than ten days.

One thing that’s coming up again and again in the work that Justin and I are doing is the language that people use to describe their business and the challenges they face.

In everything that we do, we try to draw out as accurately as possible the model of the world of the people participating in those coaching threads.

Since we only have voice available, we rely on the words they use, along with their intonation, to build that model.

That’s were the Meta Model comes in handy.

But not in the way it’s usually taught.

If you’ve read anything about NLP, you’ve of course come across the Meta Model. It’s the first big model Grinder and Bandler put out back in the 1970s.

Traditionally, NLP trainers teach it to their students using the “Meta Model violation” and “Meta Model challenge” formats.

While this paradigm may work sometimes in therapeutic encounters, it usually does not in the real world and everyday life.

Try to use a Meta Model challenge when you’re talking to someone you barely know.

They might just punch you in the face — even if they don’t, they’d probably want to.

It’s a terrible structure to use in other contexts.

When you shift the intonation of your question, you move from a challenge to an inquisitive question.

And when you do, you completely change the ball game.

This weekend, play with your intonation.

Go up. Go flat. Go down.

Play your voice like a Stradivarius.

Same words. Different sounds.

Have a good weekend, and I’ll talk to you on Monday.

PS: By the way, the First Trance process is still available at a low price. You may want to get it before the price goes up.

Right here:

http://dailynlp.com/your-first-trance