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Category Archives for "NLP Modeling"

Do as I do, not as I say

Every expert in the world, especially teachers and public speakers, should have that tattooed on their forehead when they step up to give a speech.

Therapists tried to figure out what Milton Erickson was doing for years before Bandler and Grinder came along.

Milton lectured! Milton taught!

People heard it from the horse’s mouth. But for some reason, they didn’t get it.

That’s the way it goes for most areas.

If you listen to someone talk ABOUT it, you’ll seldom get it.

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Chris got it. Do you get it?

When I started dailyNLP 6 years ago, I envisioned the day I would receive this email.

dailyNLP came later, but the mission was the exact same.

Well, this day has arrived. And I must celebrate it with you.

Chris has authorized me to share his message with you.

Enter Chris:

Hi Martin,

I want to thank you again for your various NLP sites.

Although I think I’ve read everything at “dailyNLP.com” before, something clicked today when I re-visited.

It now seems obvious to me that a lot of the confusion about NLP results from associating “work product” from an NLP mapping project with NLP itself.

I posted an analogy on one of your blog entries about how I might use NLP to map out the process necessary to make the same amazing hamburger that a famous chef is known to make. In the end, I have a repeatable process for making that amazing burger. The burger is not NLP. Making the burger is not NLP. NLP was used to map that process. The making of the burger is simply a codified process.

If this is true, then it follows that “The Swish Pattern” and similar techniques also are not NLP, but instead therapy techniques that were famously mapped by NLP. They show up alongside NLP perhaps as a demonstration, creating (for me, at least) a bit of confusion in terms of what NLP is. You explain it very clearly in your “What is NLP” page, but I couldn’t accept it at the time.

This makes things a lot clearer for me unless I’m completely mistaken about this.

On the other hand, it presents a crossroads for me- do I follow the path of learning to map using NLP or do I follow the path of using techniques that were mapped by NLP. Perhaps its not a choice that has to be made.

Thank you for your effort in making NLP accessible to anyone.

-Chris

Back to Martin:

Well done, Chris! Congratulations!

In his message, Chris refers to a comment he posted on the [masterNLP] website.

You can read his comment here:

http://dailynlp.com/faq-can-i-solve-a-bunch-of-personal-problems-using-nlp-on-myself/comment-page-1/#comment-1439

It complements nicely the observation he makes in the message.

Bottom line: Chris now gets it.

The real question is: do you?

Because once you understand this distinction, you get wings. Confusion ends. The fog of NLP lifts. And you’re able to do anything you please from that point forward.

You’ve made the distinction between NLP and changework/therapy/coaching.

I desperately hope that you either have reached or will reach the same understanding Chris has.

His journey has only just begun.

You asked for it

I got some emails last week from subscribers who really want to master modeling.

OK. So you want to master a skill. How are you going to do it?

You better be able to answer that.

Two syllables: practice.

Practice the modeling skills. Like crazy.

Here’s a primer so you have them on the tip of your tongue.

Figure out a skill you want to master. It can be anything. Public speaking, juggling, negotiating, hiring, hypnotizing, surfing, playing basketball, investing, firing, writing, and so on, ad infinitum.

Now, identify someone to model.

If you want to master juggling, identify a master juggler. If you want to master investing, find a master investor.

Cut a deal with your model. Explain you want to master their skill. Explain to them what they stand to gain from helping you (you did think about that, didn’t you?).

Then, put yourself in their presence while they’re performing.

Critical key: Don’t let them explain to you what they’re doing. If they do, don’t believe a word they say!

You want to absorb what they do, not what they say they do, and even less of the theory or story behind it all. Forget it!

In the case of an investor, sit quietly and watchful behind her as she goes through her stock analysis routine. When in doubt as to what she’s thinking or deciding, gently ask what she’s considering (gently is very important. You don’t want to totally break her pattern or else you might screw up her strategy.). You want to practically become at one with her.

Then, on next passes, you might want to have a laptop with you and go through the motions yourself.

Repeat until you feel you’re analyzing stocks just like her.

How would you know you got it? When you conduct an analysis by yourself, show it to her and she says: “That’s exactly what I would have picked.”

Then, you can go on to code your model and make it explicit using NLP.

That’s it!

That’s the straight line to modeling a pattern.

Now that you know, go do it.

And by the way, the Straight Line Results System is almost done.

To hear about it when it comes out of the oven, sign up here:

http://dailynlp.com/straightline

Last chance! If you don’t sign up, I won’t mention it here and you’ll miss it.

Source: http://dailynlp.com/reader-questions-how-to-master-practical-aspects-of-nlp/

Ants, Symphonies and Honeycombs

Do you know the difference between complex and complicated?

I’ll give you my definition.

Complex means there are a great many elements involved.

Complicated means there are a ton of rules and criteria to take into account.

The first explains how skyscrapers are built.

The second explains why it is impossible to stay in a relationship more than a few days.

Complex is amazing. It’s mindblowing.

It’s ants traveling back and forth in neat little lines. It’s bees building their symmetrical combs. It’s a Mozart symphony.

Complicated is a pain in the ass.

It’s government bureaucracy. It’s that boy(girl)friend that needs to do sixty things before leaving the house. It’s getting a publishing deal.

Let’s talk about simple.

Do you think simple is the antonym of complex or complicated?

Complicated, of course.

When we say something is simple, we mean that it’s devoid of a billion different rules and options. It’s straightforward.

Complex structures are built, mostly, out of simple material following simple processes.

Following a simple algorithm, these structures complexify over time.

Watch it in action:

It’s surreal.

And did you pay attention to the music in the background?

It was composed using only 12 notes.

Think about this: to this day, humans are still composing new music following brand new patterns using just these 12 building blocks.

Surreal!

It also works for you and your career.

You can build an entire career out of a single skill.

Just one.

Think of sushi chef Jiro Ono.

Think of soccer defenders.

Simple. Done over and over and over.

Amazing structures. Amazing results.

Forget complicated. Forget too many moving parts.

If you want to see “simple” in action in the world of hypnosis, get yourself the First Trance System.

You’ll get a script, a recording of the script, another recording of how to leverage the script in more complex situations and basic instructions.

You will use them for the rest of your life.

http://dailynlp.com/your-first-trance

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